Bruny Island

Where: Bruny Island, Tasmania
Permits: National Park Entry Fees for camping .
Costs: $80 return trip for car + campertrailer on ferry. National Park Entry Fees (we have a two month permit which cost $60 and provides access to all National Parks in Tasmania) + $10 per night in most National Park campgrounds.
Difficulty: Easy gravel roads and bitumen
Days required to do it justice: 2+ days

Sadly the only time I’ve ever heard of Bruny Island was from Channel 9’s ‘Farmer Wants a Wife’ programme a couple of years ago when Farmer Todd (I think??) was trying to snare his future wife by surfing on pretty remote beaches and eating oysters off the rocks. For the record this wasn’t what swayed our decision to head there recently for a couple of days from Hobart.

The ferry to Bruny Island

The ferry to Bruny Island

Beautiful views at Cloudy Bay

Beautiful views at Cloudy Bay

Bruny island is a fifteen minute ferry ride south of mainland Tasmania. The ferry, leaving from Kettering, is a tardis of a thing holding two levels of cars, caravans and trucks and crosses the most idyllic channel of water. Bruny has a ‘north’ and a ‘south’ island, a permanent population of about 620 and at only 100kms long contains a surprising variety of places to see . The north is mainly open pastural land while the south of the island is hilly, wild country and home to South Bruny National Park, some awesome camp spots and Adventure Bay, where Captain Cook moored his boat in 1777.  They are joined together by ‘The Neck’ – a road sized spit of land flanked on both sides by stunning stretches of white sand and turquoise ocean…and very cute ‘little’ penguins (previously know as ‘Fairy’ penguins before political correctness went mad).

Making our way to the Cloudy Bay camp 3km along a beach

Cape Bruny Lighthouse on the South Island

Cape Bruny Lighthouse on the South Island

If you stay on the bitumen you can eat your way around Bruny from fresh oysters to gourmet chocolate to awesome fresh berry pancakes. If you get off the bitumen you can drive along remote beaches and camp on quiet peninsulas, spot a plethora of native wildlife, catch squid or find your own oysters off the rocks as well as sample the serene Tassie rainforest. If you mix up the bitumen with the gravel you’ve got some happy well-fed 4Wders.

Our highlights: Berry pancakes at the Berry Farm, camping at Cloudy Bay and the Neck, fishing for squid at Dennes Point and watching the Little Penguins.

Oysters. Yum.

Oysters. Yum.

 

Leave a Reply