Shearing Shed

As a travelling photographer I spend most of my time going ‘ooo ah, check out the light over there’ and the rest of my time cursing the harsh outback light that makes it almost impossible to take any good photos during the day. But take heed – one place in Australia you are absolutely assured of the best light for photography 100% of the time is a classic aussie shearing shed.

The pictures below are from the disused Mount Wood woolshed in Sturt National Park, New South Wales. The shed was built in 1913 with 12 shearing stands. The last shearing was held in 1972 when 16,000 sheep were shorn but in its height up to 30,000 were being shorn at a time. To learn a bit more about how the shearing process and machinery worked this is a great article.

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Mount Wood woolshed has been meticulously maintained. The shearing stands and wheels where the sheep were shorn are on the right of the photo.

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The sheep pens were on the left behind the doors. The shearer would grab the sheep from the pen out to the floor for shearing.

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The wheels which controlled the knife.

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The wheels are covered with layer of red dust

The olde worlde shearing tools

The olde worlde shearing tools

The sheep pens. Check out that awesome dappled light

The sheep pens. Check out that awesome dappled light

After shearing the fleeces are thrown on the wool table for sorting and classing

After shearing the fleeces are thrown on the wool table for sorting and classing

 

The wool is the put into bales. I'm not 100% sure what this piece of machinery is...anyone know more?

The wool is then put into bales.

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The bales are weighed before being put on the trucks

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Close ups of the scales

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The back of the shearing shed

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The light on the outside of the woolshed is a bit more harsh!

 

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